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Apr 20, 2018
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  Aubie Turns 39

Aubie just had a birthday, and even though heís getting older by the year, he never seems to age.

The Auburn mascot turned 39 in February and thereís little question which family he celebrated another year as one of the nationís top mascots with. His kooky acts and heart-warming personality has made him a fan favorite at Auburn events Ö as long as his tail isnít pulled.

Aubie first came to life in 1979 with his first appearance being at the SEC basketball tournament in Birmingham. That day, Auburn upset Vanderbilt 59-53. Since then, seeing Aubie at Auburn events is as customary as seeing the Tigers play.

Following the win against Vanderbilt in Aubieís debut, Auburn and Georgia played a four-overtime game, which is the longest in tournament history. By the end of the Tigersí trip to the BJCC Arena, Aubie played a role in helping the ninth-place Auburn team advance to the semifinals of the tournament.

Over the years, Aubie has racked up nine national championships and was the first to be inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame. He accomplished all of his feats without saying a word, too.

And yet, before 1959, Aubie wasnít even an idea.

Birmingham Post-Herald artist Phil Neel created a cartoon tiger on Oct. 3, 1959, that appeared on the Auburn vs. Hardin-Simmons football program. Aubie was featured on gameday programs for the next 18 years, but hasnít made a regular sighting since 1976.

Aubie has been called back three times, though. He was featured for the 1987, 89 and 91 Iron Bowl games.

Aubieís suits are made by Brooks-Van Horn Costumes, which is based in New York. The company also does work for Walt Disney, as well as others. The design and production of each costume is $1,350.

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